After going to World Series, 85-year-old Cubs fan celebrates final victory

Wednesday night's victory for the Chicago Cubs meant much more to Fred McNally, 85, than just a World Series win. For him, it's something he's been waiting 71 years for.

Wednesday night's victory for the Chicago Cubs meant much more to Fred McNally, 85, than just a World Series win. For him, it's something he's been waiting 71 years for.

"Every Cubs fan deserves it. It's been a long time," McNally said. "I never thought it'd happen. Never thought it."

McNally snuck into a World Series game at Wrigley Field in 1945, when he was just 14-years-old. 

After ABC10 shared that story, a group of fraternity brothers at Sacramento State came up with a plan to send McNally to the game. McNally started the Pi Kappa Alpha (PIKE) chapter at the university over 30 years ago. Since then, more than 800 brothers have come to know the Air Force veteran as "Pappy."

Frat brothers raised over $10,000 to send Pappy and his youngest daughter Pamela Anderson to the game. She has grown up a Cubs fan because of her father. Turns out, a love for the Cubs has always been a family affair. McNally first grew to love the team because of his grandmother, who came to America from Denmark.

"I realized after being with my dad, that's why I'm a Cubs fan," Anderson said. "It's pretty amazing."

Anderson made the trip with her father to Chicago for Game 5. It could've been over for the Cubs after that game, but McNally's loved ones insist that he is a good luck charm.

McNally's sign about being at the World Series in 1945 got him almost celebrity attention! Anderson said fans kept asking Pappy to take pictures with them.

McNally was also shown on the jumbotron, made sure to buy a program to go alongside the one he got in 1945, and saved a bag of peanuts.

As McNally and dozens of his fellow PIKES gathered together at Fahrenheight 250 near Sac State, emotions were up-and-down throughout the game. Most of the people at the bar weren't even Cubs fans, but they were all Pappy fans. Pappy, surprisingly, stayed calm throughout the game, as his family members and friends bounced around the room with anxiety. 

"We were all from somewhere else, going to college, and to have a grandpa, an uncle, an older brother type figure, when you're walking through campus. It was a big deal for 18 to 22-year-olds," Shamus McClure, one of the fraternity alums who helped get Pappy to the game, said. "He was always there."

While most of the crowd left after a Cleveland Indians' homerun at the bottom of the 8th inning and then a rain delay, Pappy as a good luck charm came through. 

The bar stayed open late for Pappy and his crew to finish watching the game, as the Cubs took the championship. 

Wednesday night ended with Pappy singing - through tears - a new Cubs song he learned while in Chicago, with his family, both blood and brotherhood, by his side.

Copyright 2016 KXTV


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