SACRAMENTO, Calif. — Today's Why Guy question comes in via voicemail from Lesa; "...Another thing is the tinted windows. Now they're up in the driver's area, so if you get into an accident or a drive-by, you can't even identify the person because everybody has these dark tinted windows anymore. That's my Why Guy question. Thank You."

Thank you, Lesa. I see a few cars a day with window tinting in places where it's not legal.

Heavy tint obstructs a clear view of the traffic you're driving in, and it prohibits a police officer's perspective if he's approaching you on a traffic stop.

The California Vehicle Code (VC 26708) states that your front windshield can have tint on the top four inches and limited tint on both the front drivers' side and front passenger windows. 

"The California Vehicle Code states that a person cannot drive a motor vehicle with any object or material placed on the windshield or side windows," CHP Officer Elo Ceja added.

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What's the fine for a tint that’s too dark, allowing less than 88% of light into the vehicle? 

The first infraction is $25. If you don't peel the tint off, the next fine is $197. 

If that doesn't make you want to peel your tint, not sure what will, maybe the next fine of $250 will change your mind? 

A dark tint is allowed on your sedan's rear doors and the back window

So why are so many car windows tinted illegally? Well, if you see a vehicle with the front windshield or front doors heavily tinted, that car owner essentially is asking to get pulled over; however, pulling people over for committing this crime is not a priority.

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