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Sacramento based start-up TAGCarts helping pop-up hospitals in the field | Everyday Heroes

Taggart Neal created a start-up that provides medical carts to pop-up field hospitals.

SACRAMENTO, Calif. — Everyday Heroes are all around us and ABC10 wants to highlight the work they do. Every week our viewer nominates people and organizations making a difference in our community.

This week we want to introduce you to Taggart Neal, a Navy veteran using his skills in the medical field to help nurses better fight the coronavirus pandemic.

Neal is the founder of the Sacramento start-up TAGCarts, a company that makes medical workstations for hospitals. When the pandemic hit, his company realized many pop-up field hospitals did not have medical carts or healthcare workers were risking cross contamination by sharing one medical cart. To help solve the problem, TAGCarts came up with what they call HEROCarts. 

“They are single patient use, disposable bedside carts that can be used as an isolation cart or PPE cart,”  Neal said.

Drawing from experience in the Navy and his time in medical field, Neal designed an affordable and disposable cardboard based medical cart that could be loaded with gloves, masks and other personal protection equipment [PPE]. 

“The benefit of a single-patient-use cart is that it can go to the patient's bedside and anything the nurse touches only goes to that patient,” Neal said. 

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The HEROCarts are also disposable, so when a field hospital closes, the carts can be recycled, ensuring these carts are not used in another pandemic. HEROCarts are assembled by veterans who work at Pride Industries in Roseville. From there, the carts are shipped directly to hospitals.

“We recently sent some down to L.A. County and we also sent a some to the Navajo nation," Neal said.

After partnering with the Sacramento Kings Foundation, several HEROCarts were donated to Cal OES so they could be set up at coronavirus surge sites, like Sacramento’s Sleep Train Arena

“We need to recognize that the Hero cart was named after the heroes on the front line so they are the heroes of this story,” Neal said.

If you would like to nominate an Everyday Hero email John Bartell jbartell@abc10.com

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