Arizona voters will probably see marijuana legalization on the ballot once again in 2020. 

We came close to legal recreational cannabis in 2016, but ultimately, the initiative was defeated. 

Since then, public support for marijuana legalization has increased. According to Pew Research Center, 67% of Americans are in favor of legalizing it as of September 2019. 

So far, 11 states and Washington D.C. have passed laws to allow recreational weed to be regulated like alcohol. Will Arizona be caught up in the legalization wave?

We went on a trip to Denver, Los Angeles and Chicago to see how Arizona might be affected by the country's changing attitude toward marijuana. 

Colorado

Our journey started in Colorado, ground zero for legalized recreational pot in America. More than five years after it became legal, the Rocky Mountain State has generated more than $1 billion in cannabis tax revenue.

RELATED: 5 years after legalized pot, what's changed in Colorado?

After seeing recreational pot in Colorado, it started to spread across the country.

MORE: Will Arizona legalize recreational weed? The guy who helped write Colorado's law weighs in.

California

In 2016, weed became legal for all in California, now one of the largest legal marijuana markets in the world. 

Along with dispensaries and cannabis tours, the state is also home to the first marijuana cafe.

RELATED: This cafe will suggest what weed to pair with your food

Despite legalization, the black market is still booming. Many blame California’s high taxes for the continued presence of illegal pop-up shops.

And up in the state's wine country, pot farmers are butting heads with nearby winemakers. 

ON YOUTUBE: More on the legalization of marijuana

Still, business is thriving, and this green gold rush convinced Illinois to grab a piece of the pie.

RELATED: Marijuana black market thrives alongside legal dispensaries in California

Illinois

The law allowing recreational pot was signed into law over the summer, and sales start January 1.

The Illinois law also includes a social equity component, hoping to expunge the records of those caught up in America’s war on drugs and giving minorities a chance to enter the market.

RELATED: Will there be enough weed to go around? Illinois gets ready for legalization