SACRAMENTO, Calif — California Gov. Gavin Newsom on Friday announced that he is commuting the sentences of 21 inmates, most serving life terms and several who otherwise had no chance of ever leaving prison. The decisions give them a chance at release if a parole board agrees. They are:

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— Allen Burnett (Orange County) was 18 in 1992 when he and two others carjacked a college student and another man fatally shot the victim. Burnett has served 27 years of a life-without-parole term for first-degree murder. Newsom cited the fact that Burnett, now 45, was a youthful offender who has participated in a prison honor program since 2010 and whose commutation was supported by an associate warden. He commuted Burnett's sentence to 27 years to life.

— Alex Barajas (Santa Clara County) was 21 in 2005 when he shot a rival gang member and the man's friend, injuring them both. He is now 35 and has served nearly 14 years of an 80-years-to-life term for two counts of attempted murder, which included two sentencing enhancements of 25 years to life for using a firearm. Barajas has participated in a program that teaches inmates job and life skills. Newsom's commutation makes Barajas eligible for a parole suitability hearing after another year in prison. Newsom cited his young age at the time and what he termed "his disproportionately long sentencing enhancements."

— Jaime Cabrales (Los Angeles County) was 27 in 2007 when he was sentenced to 32 years to life for attempted murder for a gang-related shooting. A passenger in the car Cabrales was driving shot at four men, injuring one. The commutation makes Cabrales, now 39, eligible for a parole suitability hearing. Newsom cited Cabrales's self-improvement efforts in prison.

— Cristina Chavez (Los Angeles County) was 21 in 2008 when she drove a man to a house to burglarize a car. Chavez fired a BB gun at the car owner's brother when he confronted them, but the pellet hit another vehicle. Later that year, a woman identified as Chavez shot and injured a man in his car at a fast-food restaurant drive-through. She is serving a sentence of 34 years and 8 months to life. It includes an sentencing enhancement of 25 years to life for using a firearm in the restaurant shooting. Chavez, now 33, has served 11 years in prison. The commutation will make her eligible for a parole suitability hearing. Newsom cited her young age at the time and what he called "her disproportionately long sentence."

— Andrew Crater (Sacramento County) was 20 in 1995 when he took part in a string of robberies that ended with his accomplice killing a victim. Crater, now 43, has served more than 24 years of a life-without-parole sentence. His clemency appeal was backed by two wardens. It reduces his sentence to 25 years to life. Newsom cited his youth at the time of the crime and his self-improvement efforts in prison.

— Keefe Dashiell (Los Angeles County) was 19 in 2007 when he was involved in a gang-related shooting that injured a woman. Dashiell, now 31, has served nearly 11 years of a 30-year term for attempted murder, which included 20 years of sentencing enhancements. The commutation makes Dashiell eligible for a parole suitability hearing. Newsom cited support from prison staff and what he called Dashiell's "disproportionately long sentencing enhancements."

— Leonia Esteem (Riverside County) was 47 when she tried to kill her boyfriend during an argument. She is now 61 and has served nearly 14 years of a 32-years-to-life term for attempted murder, including a 25-years-to-life enhancement for use of a firearm. The commutation makes Esteem eligible for a parole suitability hearing. Newsom cited her self-improvement efforts and what Newsom called her "disproportionately long sentencing enhancements."

— Jacoby Felix (Sacramento County) was 18 in 1993 when he and an accomplice fatally shot a man while trying to steal his car. He is now 43 and has served nearly 26 years of a life-without-parole sentence. Newsom commuted his sentence to 26 years to life. He cited Felix's youth at the time of the crime and his self-improvement efforts in prison.

—Dimitri Gales (Los Angeles County) was 19 when his accomplice shot a rival gang member in the arm, injuring him. Gales, 26, has served seven years of an 18 years-to-life term for attempted voluntary manslaughter in a gang-related shooting. The commutation makes him eligible for a parole suitability hearing in his 10th year of incarceration. Newsom cited his "exceptional conduct" in prison and his youth at the time of the shooting.

— Theodore Gray (Shasta County) was 22 when he was sentenced to 40 years to life for robbery and murder. He has now served nearly 20 years in prison, where he earned a bachelor's degree and is a certified alcohol- and drug-treatment counselor. Newsom said Gray has been formally commended by staff 79 times for his positive attitude and influence on other inmates. The commutation will make him eligible for a parole suitability hearing in his 25th year of incarceration.

— Crystal Jones (Sacramento County) was 20 in 1999 when he and an accomplice killed a man during a drug-related murder. He has served nearly 20 years of a life-without-parole sentence and is now 41. Newsom said Jones is currently a hospice worker and has been commended by prison staff for his dedication to his work. He commuted Jones' sentence to 25 years to life.

— Marcus McJimpson (Fresno County) was 21 in 1988 when he shot and killed two men during an altercation. He has served 31 years on two life-without-parole sentences and is now 52. Newsom said he was a founding member of the Paws for Life dog training program. He commuted the sentence to 35 years to life.

— Adonis Muldrow (Santa Clara County) was 15 when he and a 26-year-old accomplice robbed four businesses, and his accomplice fatally shot a man during a carjacking. Both men shot at a pursuing police officer, who was not seriously injured. The commutation makes Muldrow eligible for a parole suitability hearing in his 10th year of incarceration, about 2022. Newsom cited the fact that he was a minor at the time of his crime.

— Maurice Nails (Alameda County) was 21 in 2007 when he fatally shot a man after a dispute outside of a nightclub. Nails, now 33, has served 11 years of a 40-years-to-life sentence, including a 25-years-to-life sentencing enhancement for using a firearm. The commutation makes him eligible for a parole suitability hearing in his 15th year of incarceration, about 2022. Newsom cited his young age at the time of the killing and what the governor called his "disproportionately long sentencing enhancements."

— Alladin Pangilinan (Alameda County) was 19 when he was sentenced to 69 years and 8 months to life for first-degree murder. Pangilinan was sentenced as a repeat offender for his role in three gang-related crimes that ended with an accomplice killing a suspected rival gang member. Pangilinan, 42, has served more than 23 years in prison. The commutation makes him eligible for a parole suitability hearing in his 25th year of incarceration. Newsom cited his age at the time of the crimes and what he termed "disproportionately long sentencing enhancements."

— Doris Roldan (Los Angeles County) was 42 when she worked with two accomplices to kill her husband in 1981. She is now 80 and has served 38 years of a sentence of life without chance of parole. Her warden recommended her commutation, which reduces her sentence to 38 years to life. Newsom cited her "exceptional conduct in prison."

— Bryant Salas (Los Angeles County) was 18 in 2007 when he participated in a gang-related fight during which an accomplice stabbed two men, killing one. Salas, 30, has served 12 years of a 32-years-to-life term for second-degree murder. Newsom cited his participation in an honors program and the Paws for Life service dog training program. The commutation will make Salas eligible for a parole suitability hearing in his 15th year of incarceration, about 2021.

— Lazaro Tanori (Los Angeles County) was 19 in 2006 when he tried to rob a pawn shop at gunpoint, though no one was injured. He was sentenced to 21 years and 4 months in prison for attempted robbery, including a 20-year enhancement for using a gun. He is now 32 and has served 13 years. The commutation makes him eligible for a parole suitability hearing. Newsom cited his youth and what he called "his disproportionately long sentencing enhancement."

— Marsi Torres (Los Angeles County) was 18 when she shot a 16-year-old rival gang member, who survived. She has served more than 12 years of a 50-years-to-life term for attempted murder. The sentence included a 25-years-to-life enhancement for using a firearm and a 10-year gang enhancement. Newsom said Torres, 30, has been commended by staff for her positive attitude and commitment to assisting other inmates. The commutation makes her eligible for a parole suitability hearing.

— Antonio Toy (Los Angeles County) was 23 when he shot a man in the leg after an altercation. He is now 33 and has served nearly 10 years of a 39-years-to-life sentence for attempted murder, which included a sentencing enhancement of 25 years to life for using a firearm. The commutation makes him eligible for a parole suitability hearing in his 15th year of incarceration. Newsom cited Toy's youth at the time of the crime what the governor termed his "disproportionately long sentencing enhancement."

— Luis Velez (Sacramento County) was 26 when he killed an armed transport guard during a robbery. He has served more than 28 years of a life-without-parole sentence. Newsom commuted the sentence for Velez, now 55, to 28 years to life. He cited Velez's "exceptional conduct and self-development efforts in prison."

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Source: Governor's office.

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