WACO,Texas — Naegleia Fowleri, the brain-eating amoeba that killed a New Jersey surfer, was identified at BSR Cable Park, according to the Waco-McLennan County Health District.

The district released the findings Friday. The release said in part, "Results of environmental sampling conducted by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in collaboration with the Waco-McLennan County Public Health District (WMCPHD) and the Texas Department of State Health Services (DSHS) found evidence of Naegleria fowleri, a free-living ameba (single-celled organism) that causes Primary Amebic Meningoencephalitis, a rare and devastating brain infection with an over 97% fatality rate at the BSR Cable Park and Surf Resort (BSR). A New Jersey resident who had visited BSR this summer died after contracting the disease. Epidemiologic and environmental assessment indicates that exposure likely occurred at this facility."

The release also said that while the amoeba was found in the park, it was not specifically found "in the Surf Resort, Lazy River, or the Royal Flush on the day of sampling."

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Kelly Craine with McLennan County Public Health District told KCEN Channel 6 on Friday that the surf park, the lazy river, and the royal flush slide had conditions that were favorable to the growth of the amoeba.

Craine said there was no chlorine to disinfect the water and the water had a high turbidity, which means it was cloudy. She also said there were fecal matter bacteria in the water, which also contributes to an environment ideal for brain-eating ameoba.

The Waco-McLennan County Health District said that the Surf Resort, Lazy River, and the Royal Flush are closed and will not reopen without consultation with the health district and a proper treatment.

The full release from the Waco-McLennan County Health District is below:

"Results of environmental sampling conducted by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in collaboration with the Waco-McLennan County Public Health District (WMCPHD) and the Texas Department of State Health Services (DSHS) found evidence of Naegleria fowleri, a free-living ameba (single celled organism) that causes Primary Amebic Meningoencephalitis, a rare and devastating brain infection with an over 97% fatality rate at the BSR Cable Park and Surf Resort (BSR). A New Jersey resident who had visited BSR this summer died after contracting the disease. Epidemiologic and environmental assessment indicate that exposure likely occurred at this facility.

"N.fowleri was identified in the Cable Park but not specifically found in the Surf Resort, Lazy River, or the Royal Flush on the day of sampling. Although the N. fowleri was not detected in the Surf Resort, Lazy River, or the Royal Flush, the presence of fecal indicator organisms, high turbidity, low free chlorine levels, and other ameba that occur along with N. fowleri indicate conditions favorable for N. fowleri growth. For additional information, refer to the attached Environmental Microbiology Laboratory report.

"The BSR water venues known as the Surf Resort, Lazy River, and the Royal Flush are currently closed and will not re-open without consultation with the WMCPHD and not before all health and safety issues have been addressed and mitigated appropriately. The Cable Park may remain open to the general public because the risk of exposure to N. fowleri is considered the same as any other natural bodies of freshwater and is not amenable to treatment. WMCPHD is working with the owner who is consulting with water treatment experts to evaluate the situation and develop a comprehensive water quality management plan to include current regulatory requirements.

"The mission of the Waco-McLennan County Public Health District is to protect public health and safety. We appreciate the cooperation and assistance from the CDC and DSHS and will continue working diligently to address the issues raised by the report."

The lab results provided the health district are as follows:

Health District Amoeba Report - 10-12-18 by Paris on Scribd

Prior to the release of the health district's report, BSR Cable Park owner, Stuart Parsons, released a statement Friday that said the water test results at the park came back clean of the brain-eating amoeba Naegleria Fowleri.

The park closed its wave pool September 30 after Fabrizio 'Fab' Stabile visited the park and died from the deadly bacteria.

Parsons also announced that a state of the art water filtration system would be installed for the surf pool, Lazy river and at the Royal Flush slide.

According to the BSR press release, a North Carolina firm will work with local and state officials and the Centers for Disease Control to install the filtration system which will take until February.

"I built this water destination resort so people of all ages could learn to surf and wakeboard — and then go home safely to their families," said Parsons.

"We take pride in our park and the safety of every guest. And to be clear, it’s not just the guests that use the park. It’s also my family, our friends, and our employees that essentially live in our water. My 2-year-old twins play on that beach, and — as kids do — they drink the water every time. So, you better believe my cousin, who tests and treats the water every day, is damn sure no one gets sick."

Parsons also offered condolences to Stabile's family and friends.

"A precious life has been lost, and we are deeply saddened for his loved ones," said Parsons.

Parson's full release is below:

"BSR SURF RESORT, Lazy River & Royal Flush slide WATER TESTS COME BACK CLEAN

Installation of State of-the-Art Filtration System Already Underway; BSR Determined to Go the Extra Mile, Set Highest Standards for Safety First and foremost, on behalf of the entire staff at BSR Surf Resort, our hearts and prayers are with Fab Stabile’s family, friends, and the New Jersey surf community. A precious life has been lost, and we are deeply saddened for his loved ones.

"For the past two weeks, increased awareness of this incredibly rare disease, Naegleria fowleri, has swept the globe. What will come of all this news coverage and commentary? At BSR Surf Park, we are determined it will help save lives.

"Although comprehensive test results have now confirmed that the water at BSR Surf Resort meets every standard for safety, today I am announcing that we are going the extra mile and hiring a North Carolina firm to install a state-of-the-art filtration system to make our water in the surf, on lazy river, and at the Royal Flush slide is as clear and clean as humanly possible. It will take us to February to complete the installation of this new filtration system working very closely with local, state and CDC officials.

"There are only a few of these man-made surf parks in the country today, but many more will be built. Our goal is to set the highest standard for these facilities. Going forward, BSR Surf Resort will have the cleanest water anywhere in the United States.

"I built this water destination resort so people of all ages could learn to surf and wakeboard — and then go home safely to their families. We take pride in our park and the safety of every guest. And to be clear, it’s not just the guests that use the park. It’s also my family, our friends, and our employees that essentially live in our water. My two-year-old twins play on that beach, and — as kids do — they drink the water every time.

"So you better believe my cousin, who tests and treats the water every day, is damn sure no one gets sick.

"BSR wants to thank everyone that has supported us from the start, and believed in what we are trying to do. We want to make people happy — and safe — and that’s what we are going to continue to do.

We will update you on our progress through social media and our webpage, and look forward to seeing everyone soon with clear, blue, clean water."

The fatality rate for Naegleria Fowleri is more than 97 percent, according to the CDC. Only four out of 143 known infected individuals in the United States from 1962 to 2017 survived, the CDC said.

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