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After recovering from coronavirus, Charlotte woman donates plasma hoping her antibodies will help others

For the first time, WCNC Charlotte is hearing from a Charlotte woman who donated plasma, after recovering from the virus.

CHARLOTTE, N.C. — There are major developments in how people potentially immune to Coronavirus are changing the path forward.

For the first time, WCNC Charlotte is hearing from a Charlotte woman who donated plasma, after recovering from the virus.   She’s hoping her antibodies will help others.

WCNC Charlotte first spoke to Raven McGregor a few weeks ago, when she recovered from coronavirus.  Almost immediately, she started looking at ways to help others.

During her fight against coronavirus, McGregor said she had a fever of 103 and shortness of breath.

“It was really miserable,” McGregor told WCNC Charlotte. “I just felt like I was going to die, so I had a really different perspective after I recovered.”

After battling the virus for seven days, McGregor moved quickly to help others.

“My mom told me I could donate plasma,” McGregor said.

According to the FDA, people who’ve recovered from COVID 19 have antibodies that can potentially help others fighting the virus.  McGregor says while researching places to donate, she came upon BioLife.

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“Yesterday, I donated some plasma, so hopefully I'll be able to help someone recover from this virus,” said McGregor.

McGregor said she first had to fill out a questionnaire about her medical history and her COVID 19 diagnosis.

“If I had a positive COVID test, you have to show proof of that, how long you've been symptom-free,” said McGregor.

McGregor says the whole process took about two hours but donating plasma itself lasted closer to 30 minutes.  She tells WCNC Charlotte is was definitely worth her time.

“It’s really simple and it's painless and it could really help save a life,” said McGregor. “You can turn a negative experience into a positive one and I think that's what really matters.”

People who donate plasma at BioLife are compensated, but McGregor said that’s not the reason she decided to participate.

The FDA has more information about plasma donation and who is eligible to donate, click HERE.

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