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COVID cases have spiked in Sacramento region. Should you be concerned?

Officials are watching the case rates closely and say we should remain in good shape as long as hospitalizations remain low.

SACRAMENTO COUNTY, Calif. — Health officials in the Sacramento region are reporting a recent spike in coronavirus cases, but say that upward trend is not correlating with more hospitalizations and deaths, which they're calling a positive sign.

Both Sacramento and Yolo counties, along with much of California, are seeing the most significant spike in COVID cases since the prior record-setting case amounts this past January after the holiday rush.

Sacramento County Public Health is reporting a 7-day average of 12 cases per 100,000 residents, according to the county’s COVID dashboard’s latest data. Yolo County is reporting a 7-day average of 16 cases per 100,000 residents, according to the county’s COVID dashboard.

“We are seeing an uptick in cases in general, consistent with the rest of the state,” said Samantha Mott, a Sacramento County spokesperson. “Possibly due to circulation of sub-variants of omicron/delta.”

However, she says hospitalizations and deaths are not increasing at the same rates, which is a sign that vaccinations efforts are working to prevent severe disease and deaths.

“For those that haven't been vaccinated, we urge you to take advantage of one of our many free clinics throughout the county each week,” Mott said. “It is important for people to remain up-to-date on their COVID vaccinations.”

Yolo County health officials say they’re experiencing similar trends and monitoring them closely.

"We are now in high community transmission, with case rates continuing to increase and wastewater signals also increasing,” said Dr. Amy Sisson, the Yolo County Health Officer. “I strongly recommend masking indoors and staying up to date with vaccination. Get tested if you have any symptoms or have been in close contact with someone infected with COVID-19."

Yolo County has plans to increase their COVID response efforts with the addition of a "test-to-treat" clinic, said John Fout, a Yolo County Spokesperson.

“You can come in, get a rapid test or come in and bring proof of positivity,” Fout said. “And if you have positive and you have symptoms, then they will actually do a telehealth appointment on site with a doctor or with a nurse and get a sense of where you’re at. And you may immediately get a pill to help you fight off severe consequences.”

Officials are watching the case rates closely and say we should remain in good shape as long as hospitalizations remain low.

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