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Here's what Sacramento County's coronavirus stay-at-home order applies to

As part of the order, residents are told to stay at home except for “essential activities, essential government functions, or to operate essential businesses.”

SACRAMENTO COUNTY, Calif. — A mandatory stay-at-home order, to a sheltering in place, will go into effect for residents in Sacramento beginning at midnight to help combat coronavirus, March 20, county officials announced.

As part of the order, residents are told to stay at home except for “essential activities, essential government functions, or to operate essential businesses.”

The order mandates the closure of all bars, wineries, and brewpubs. It also orders an end to all in-dining at restaurants, but still allows for home delivery and takeout. All gyms, bingo halls, and card rooms will also be required to close.

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According to county officials, essential travel is defined in the six following categories:

  • Engaging in activities or perform tasks essential to health and safety, or to the health and safety of their family or household members, such as, obtaining medical supplies or medication, visiting a health care professional, or obtaining supplies they need to work from home.
  • Obtaining necessary services or supplies for themselves and their family or household members, or to deliver those services or supplies to others, such as food and other grocery and cleaning products.
  • Engaging in outdoor activity, provided the individuals comply with Social Distancing Requirements as defined, such as walking, hiking, biking, running or equestrian activities.
  • Performing work to provide essential products and services at essential businesses and government entities as well as other nonprofit organizations.
  • Caring for a family member or pet in another household.
  • Attending private gatherings of not more than six nonrelatives in a home or place of residence. Social distancing should be practiced at all times at such gatherings.

Officials say the order will remain in place until 11:59 p.m. on April 7 “or until it is extended, rescinded, superseded, or amended in writing by the Health Officer.” The order will be enforced by local law enforcement, but officials did not clearly state what that enforcement would look like.

As of March 19, Sacramento County has 45 confirmed cases of coronavirus and three deaths attributed to the virus, officials said.

Sacramento County is now the fifth county in Northern California to institute this type of order. So far, residents in Yolo, Yuba, Sutter, and Solano counties have been ordered to shelter in place.

Read more about coronavirus from ABC10:

Background on coronavirus

According to the CDC, coronavirus (COVID-19) is a family of viruses that is spreadable from person to person. Coronavirus is believed to have been first detected in a seafood market in Wuhan, China in December 2019. If someone is sick with coronavirus, the symptoms they may show include mild to severe respiratory illness, cough, and difficulty breathing.

Currently, there is no vaccine, however, the CDC suggests the following precautions, along with any other respiratory illness:

  • Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth.
  • Stay home when you are sick.
  • Cover your cough or sneeze with a tissue, then throw the tissue in the trash.
  • Clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces using a regular household cleaning spray or wipe.
  • Wash your hands with soap and water for a minimum of 20 seconds.

The CDC also says facemasks should only be used by people who show symptoms of the virus. If you’re not sick, you do not have to wear a facemask. The CDC says the immediate risk to the U.S. public is low.

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