Despite being one of the most popular amphibious vehicles sold to the general public from about 1961 to about 1967, only a few hundred Amphicars are in working condition today.

“Wild” Bill Hill is the proud owner of the boat car, which was originally manufactured in West Germany.

"The best thing about this car is not having to use a boat trailer," Hill said, who likes to drive into the water going 30 miles per hour or more.

The Amphicar is not particularly fast in the water or on land.

"I think the engine only puts out about 43 horse power," Hill said.

"Wild" Bill Hill also owns a tattoo shop. He got his name because of his wild personality, and wild car collection. His garage is full of odd cars and motorcycles, and he's won numerous trophies for his collection.

Hill bought the Amphicar from a man out of Cool, California. It was partially restored, and Hill made the car sea worthy.

"On land, it drives like a boat. In the water, it drives like a car,” Hill said.

Two small propellors on the back end of the car move the Amphicar forward and backward. The front tires are submerged and act as rudders, steering the car right and left.

Hill's baby blue Amphicar gets a lot of comments at the boat ramp. He likes to cruise along the Sacramento River at Discovery Park and waters of Folsom Lake. The upholstery is fully restored and he always carries a fishing pole just in case.

"People always come up to me and tell me the first time they ever saw an Amphicar,” Hill said. "I end up showing them all the modifications I made."

Hill's Amphicar is a one-of-a-kind vehicle, but there is one potential problem that's always on Wild Bill's mind -- leaks.

"We don't say the ‘L’ word in this car,” Hill said.

Amphicars are prone to take on water, but if Hill's feet get wet, all he has to do is drive up on land.