Update: September 14, 4:30 p.m.

The woman who allegedly threw a blood-like substance onto the California Senate floor was identified as Rebecca Dalelio.

Rebecca Dalelio
Rebecca Dalelio, the person arrested for allegedly throwing blood on the Senate floor on Friday, Sept. 13.
Courtesy: Sacramento County Sheriff's Office

Update: 10:10 p.m.

One woman has been arrested after the California Highway Patrol said she threw what appeared to be blood onto the Senate floor.

A news release from the California Highway Patrol said officers have arrested the woman on charges including assault, vandalism and disrupting the orderly conduct of official business at the state Capitol.

CHP said the incident happened around 5:14 p.m. The incident caused the Senate floor and gallery to close. 

Police did not identify the woman or offer a motive, referring to her as a "demonstrator." But the act came as hundreds of protesters packed the Capitol to demonstrate against a recently passed law seeking to crack down on fraudulent medical exemptions for vaccinations.

She was charged with the following:

  • 171f (2) PC – Willfully and knowingly engaging in any conduct within the State Capitol which disrupts the orderly conduct of official business
  • 242 PC – Assault
  • 594 PC - Vandalism
  • 1861 (b) CCR – Obstructing or interfering with the use of state property
  • 9050 GOV – Willfully preventing Legislature from meeting or organizing
  • 9051 GOV – Willfully disturbing Legislature while in session

A group identifying themselves as Freedom Angels had been engaged in a two week occupation at the Capitol building to protest against a bill that seeks to curb the fraudulent issuance of medical exemptions for vaccinations. Gov. Gavin Newsom signed the bill into law earlier this week.

Heide Munoz-Gleisner, founder of the organization, disavowed the woman's actions, saying she was in "no way, shape or form" affiliated with their organization.

“We don’t know who she is. That’s the thing, no one’s seen that person before,” said Munoz-Gleisner.

“We in no way, shape, or form condone that behavior. We’ve never called for that behavior," she added.

Original story:

California lawmakers are meeting in a committee room after a woman threw red liquid from the public gallery in the Senate chambers.

The Senate had just finished a vote Friday when a woman tossed a red liquid from the public gallery and declared "that's for the dead babies."

Senators, staff and others cleared the room as authorities investigated.

Friday is the final day of the legislative session, and lawmakers have bills to debate before adjourning for the year. The Senate is scheduled to finish its work in a committee room.

Senate President Pro Tempore Toni Atkins said Capitol law enforcement officials had dealt with the situation. Representatives from the California Highway Patrol have not commented.

California Legislature
State Senator Mike McGuire, D-Healdsburg, right, leaves the Senate Chambers after a red substance was thrown from the Senate Gallery during the Senate session at the Capitol in Sacramento, Calif., Friday, Sept. 13, 2019. The Senate was cleared as an investigation is taking place. Authorities took a person into custody.(AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli)
AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli

The incident comes as dozens of protesters filled the Capitol to demonstrate against a bill that seeks to curb the fraudulent issuance of medical exemptions for vaccinations. Gov. Gavin Newsom signed the bill into law earlier this week, which would make it harder for parents to get medical exemptions for vaccinating their children

The legislation had inspired protesters to come out in mass against the new law. 

Senate Republican Leader Shannon, who voted against SB 276, released a statement condemning the actions of the person.

"Violence in any form cannot and should not be tolerated during the process of Democracy," Grove said in a statement. "Senate Republicans condemn the violent and unacceptable behavior that took place at the State Capitol this evening."  

Sen. Pat Bates also released a statement saying the incident was a criminal act. 

"All citizens are entitled to advocate for their positions on public policy, but disrupting public proceedings is unacceptable," Bates said.

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