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Justice commission, civilian review board authority part of criminal justice reform act proposed to lawmakers

The organization’s package, titled the California Law Enforcement Accountability and Community Justice Act, includes six recommendations.

SACRAMENTO, Calif. — The nonprofit organization California Attorneys for Criminal Justice [CACJ] has created a package of recommendations for legislators, aimed at addressing racial inequality and bias in law enforcement and the judicial system.

The organization’s package, titled the California Law Enforcement Accountability and Community Justice Act, includes recommendations like establishing a state justice commission, expansion of civilian review board authority, expansion of officer body cameras, and more.

“Our criminal justice system is plagued with racial bias, from disproportionate traffic stops and arrests of people of color to juries lacking diversity, and police abuse going unpunished,” said CACJ President Eric Schweitzer, who is also an attorney in Fresno.

In brief, the California Law Enforcement Accountability and Community Justice Act includes the following:

  1. Establish the California Justice Commission
  2. Expansion of Civilian Review Board authority
  3. Create the Law Enforcement Responsibility Act
  4. Increased use of body cameras in California and strengthen transparency and public access to the recordings. 
  5. Strengthen current law prohibiting prosecutors from unjustly eliminating people of color from juries.
  6. Restore voting rights to individuals serving parole.

CACJ is a collection of criminal defense attorneys and other professionals whose goal is to improve the criminal justice system.

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