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What $1,500 a month in housing can get you in San Diego County

Amarillo, Texas topped the list at 1,411 square feet and San Diego is at the bottom of the list, at 463 square feet, more than 2/3 smaller.

SAN DIEGO — When it comes to rent and what you get for your money, San Diego is #1...#1 at getting the least bang for your buck.

At least that's what a new survey says.

Rent Café, “How Much Space You Can Get for $1,500 in the Best Cities for Renters” researched on how much square footage you can get for $1,500 a month.

Amarillo, Texas topped the list at 1,411 square feet and San Diego is at the bottom of the list, at 463 square feet, more than 2/3 smaller.

“It's horrible...it's absolutely horrible,” said Melissa Vergara, who has lived in San Diego her entire life.

She can't believe how ridiculous rent is these days. 540 square feet in the college area is currently listed online for $2,037 a month.

“If I'm going to pay that much, I want to be able to step out my door and be right there on the beach, but you're definitely not doing that here,” said Vergara.

So, what can you get here for $1,500 a month? CBS 8 found the following:

  • 594 square feet studio advertised in Santee for $1,465 a month
  • 476 square feet studio in La Mesa for $1,325 a month
  • 133 square feet in National City for $1,431 a month

But the survey also found is that San Diego renters tend to be younger than those in many other cities and don't really need as much space.

“They don't have families, they're not married, they spend time in their apartment, but they don't spend a lot of time in their apartment,” said Doug Ressler with Yardi Matrix.

Little Rock, Arkansas came in second for square footage at 1,395 and Oklahoma City was third at 1,390.

In case you're wondering, there's not a single California city in the top 20, but San Diego’s 463 square feet was dead last.

Those behind the survey say there is reason for optimism...San Diego's future housing situation is looking better than a lot of other cities.

“We look at the new supply coming in,” said Ressler. “San Diego is one of the highest percentages of under construction rental units on the coast right now.”

But with inflation soaring, how long will it take before prices start to drop?

Many San Diegans fear things are going to get worse before they get better, including Melissa who is thinking about leaving her hometown.

“It's beautiful. We can't complain about the weather, but it's just too expensive.”

WATCH RELATED: Newsom signs bill making it easier for houses of worship to build affordable housing (July 2022)

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