A study conducted by The Trust for America’s Health and Robert Wood Johnson Foundation found that around 25 percent of California adults and 15 percent of teens and preteens are obese.

The World Economic Forum estimates that by 2050 the amount of plastics in the ocean will outweigh the amount of fish.

New California laws set to go into effect in 2019 aim to decrease both of these disturbing trends.

Soda or juice will no longer be a main option for children beginning in 2019. Diners also won’t see plastic straws with their drink orders unless they ask for them specifically. Both are changes comply with Senate Bill 1192 and Assembly Bill 1884, respectively. Here are the specifics of those two bills:

SB 1192

SB 1192 was passed to encourage children to drink healthier beverages when eating out. In 2019, parents and children should see menu options that include different waters, like sparkling and flavored (with no added natural or artificial sweeteners), unflavored milk or nondairy milk alternatives that are no more than 130 calories per container or serving.

Language in the bill state that it’s not meant to prevent soda and juice from being sold. They instead want to make sure children have healthier options that are promoted more to encourage children to get in the habit of making healthy decisions.

AB 1884

AB 1884 was created to help curtail the use of plastics that may someday wind up in the ocean.

Plastic straws are non-recyclable and often make it to landfills and eventually could wind up in the ocean.

Under the new bill, diners will have to ask for a straw if they want one. If a restaurant is caught giving out straws without being asked they could be fined upwards of $300.

This law only affects you if you are at a restaurant where you don’t serve yourself a beverage. School cafeterias, food trucks, health care facilities, vending machines and farmers markets are not affected.

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