x
Breaking News
More () »

Sacramento's Leading Local News: Weather, Traffic, Sports and more | Sacramento, California | ABC10.com

VOTER GUIDE | Everything you need to know about Ohio's 2020 election from important dates to finding your polling place

Election day is almost here!

CLEVELAND — Editor's note: This video is from Oct. 23, 2020.

Whether you plan to vote in person or by absentee, there's a lot you need to know before casting your ballot this election year amid the COVID-19 pandemic

Don't worry! We've got you covered!

Below we've compiled a guide that features every important date, deadline or question you might have about this year's November election. Happy voting!

RELATED: Election questions? 3News can help! Submit your questions and we will find the answers

WHEN IS ELECTION DAY?

Tuesday, Nov. 3. 

WHEN ARE THE POLLS OPEN? 

Ohio's polls will be open that day for in-person voting from 6:30 a.m. until 7:30 p.m.

HOW DO I REGISTER TO VOTE?

The deadline to register for the Nov. 3 election passed back on Oct. 5.

WHERE IS MY POLLING PLACE?

Planning to vote at the polls in person? You can find your polling location HERE.

WHAT COVID-19 PRECAUTIONS ARE IN PLACE?

Elections officials have released a 48-point plan to keep voters safe during the election amid ongoing COVID-19 concerns. The main highlights of the safety plan are:

  • Routine cleaning of voting machines and e-pollbooks.
  • Mask requirements and regular hand washing for all poll workers.
  • Social distancing recommendations.
  • Making curbside voting available.

You can read the full COVID-19 safety plan below:

SUBSCRIBE: Get the day's top headlines sent to your inbox each weekday morning with the free 3News to GO! newsletter

WHAT FORM OF ID SHOULD I BRING SO I CAN VOTE?

You need to have a form of ID with you to cast a ballot on election day. Acceptable forms of identification are listed HERE.

WHAT IF I FORGET MY ID?

You can cast a provisional ballot by providing your Ohio driver's license or state identification number OR the last four digits of your Social Security number. Once the information is reviewed and verified by the board of elections, your ballot will be counted.

But... There's more...

"If you do not provide one of the above documents or your driver’s license/state identification number or the last four digits of your Social Security number at the precinct, you will still be able to vote using a provisional ballot," according to the Ohio Secretary of State site. "However, in order for that ballot to be counted, you must return to the board of elections no later than seven days following Election Day to provide a qualifying form of identification."

WHAT'S THE DEADLINE FOR ABSENTEE VOTING?

There are a few dates you need to know if you're planning to vote using an absentee ballot:

  • Oct. 6: Absentee ballots begin distribution.
  • Oct. 27: Ohio Secretary of State called this the "realistic deadline" for requesting your absentee ballot. “As you all know, the law says that you may continue to request absentee ballots up until the Saturday before election at noon. That’s a terrible idea," LaRose said during a press conference Sept. 8. "We’re telling everyone, as far as we’re concerned, the logistical deadline, the realistic deadline, is the 27th of October. You really should not request an absentee ballot after that because chances are that you’ll get it on Wednesday or Thursday after the election is over." 
  • Nov. 2: Your absentee ballot must be postmarked by this date if you're mailing it in.
  • Nov. 3 at 7:30 p.m.: This is the last time you can submit your absentee ballot at any of the drop boxes located at each county's Board of Elections.

RELATED: Why you may not want to wait until Election Day to vote

RELATED: Watch | Your step-by-step guide to sending in your absentee ballot in Ohio

HOW DO I TRACK MY ABSENTEE BALLOT?

Simple. There's a tracking tool for all Ohio voters to use HERE.

DO I HAVE TO MAIL MY ABSENTEE BALLOT?

No. You can also submit your ballot into a secure drop box at your county's Board of Elections location. The deadline to drop of your ballot is the same time the polls close -- at 7:30 p.m. on election day.

RELATED: How secure are ballot drop boxes in Ohio? Secretary of State Frank LaRose discusses 2020 election procedures

IS THERE EARLY IN-PERSON VOTING?

Yes! Starting Tuesday, Oct. 6, registered voters can cast an absentee ballot in person. Early in-person voting locations will be announced HERE soon. The early voting schedule is listed as follows:

  • Oct. 6-16 (weekdays only): 8 a.m. until 5 p.m.
  • Oct. 19-23: 8 a.m. until 6 p.m.
  • Saturday, Oct. 24: 8 a.m. until 4 p.m.
  • Sunday, Oct. 25 from 1-5 p.m.
  • Oct. 26-30: 8 a.m. until 7 p.m.
  • Saturday, Oct. 31: 8 a.m. until 4 p.m.
  • Sunday, Nov. 1: 1-5 p.m.
  • Monday, Nov. 2: 8 a.m. until 2 p.m.

WHAT RACES ARE ON MY BALLOT?

There are a handful of issues in each county from tax levies to charter amendments. But what your area's specific issues? CLICK HERE to see a sample of your local ballot so you can study up before the results start coming in.

RELATED: Guide: Issues on the November 2020 ballot in Cuyahoga County

WHAT TIME WILL RESULTS COME IN?

We expect to see the first results shortly after 7:30 p.m. LaRose said, however, Ohioans need to be mindful that these will not be "official" results due to the expected increase in absentee ballots because of the COVID-19 pandemic. The state is changing the way it reports results on election night to clearly state the number of outstanding absentee ballots that have not yet been tabulated.

WHERE CAN I WATCH FOR RESULTS?

We will showcase live results all night long after the polls close at wkyc.com/elections. Be sure to follow WKYC on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and YouTube for our complete coverage.

SHOW OFF YOUR 'I VOTED' STICKER

Did you get your "I Voted" sticker? Send us a picture on Facebook, Twitter or by texting it to us at 216-344-3300. If you voted absentee, you can download a virtual "I Voted" sticker to show off HERE.

RELATED: November 2020 election: Important dates all Ohio voters need to know