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California judge says ride-hailing law Prop 22 is unconstitutional

Alameda County Superior Court Judge Frank Roesch ruled Friday that Proposition 22 is unconstitutional and can’t be enforced.

LOS ANGELES — A judge has struck down California’s ballot measure that exempted Uber and other companies from a state law requiring their drivers to be classified as employees eligible for benefits and job protections. 

Alameda County Superior Court Judge Frank Roesch ruled Friday that Proposition 22, which allowed the drivers to be classified as independent contractors, is unconstitutional and can’t be enforced.

Proposition 22 passed in November after Uber, Lyft and other app-based services spent $200 million in its favor, making it the most expensive ballot measure in state history. 

The ruling sets up a fight that could likely end up in California’s Supreme Court.

California Sen. Dave Cortese, (D-San Jose), who serves as chair of the California Senate Labor, Public Employment and Retirement Committee, issued the following statement on the judge’s ruling:

“Today is a win for workers. I’m proud to see the same argument made by myself and my colleague Assemblymember Kalra in our plea to the California Supreme Court be used in today’s ruling – that Proposition 22 would limit our ability as Legislators to provide workers the protections they are granted under the U.S. Constitution and the Constitution of the State of California. Thank you to all of the labor leaders who pushed to overturn this injustice.”

Read the full story from the Associated Press.

Read more from ABC10

WATCH ALSO: California Prop 22 explained: App-Based Drivers as Contractors, including Uber, Lyft & DoorDash