While air temperature can be in the 80s, concrete and blacktop surfaces can warm to well over 100 degrees.

Meanwhile, some green grass will tend to stay at a relatively constant temperature.

Each blade of grass has water in it, and water takes longer to warm up and cool down. That means the grass will generally hold a more steady temperature.

Brown grass, on the other hand, is drier so it will feel hotter.

As for blacktop surfaces, the black color attracts the sun's rays, and, since it's also dry, it doesn’t take much sun energy to heat it up or cool it down.

Concrete is pretty much the same, but, since it’s a little lighter, it doesn’t get quite as warm.

Our furry friends may still need that afternoon or evening walk though, and it only takes five seconds to know whether it's too hot.

An easy way to test temperature on a surface is called the 5 second rule.

Just test the back of your hand on the pavement and if it’s too hot for you…it’s too hot for your pet. 

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